NJ Transit: Service Update For Montclair-Boonton Line Starting Monday

BY  |  Saturday, Nov 17, 2012 10:12pm  |  COMMENTS (27)

Changes from NJ Transit, starting this Monday, plus weekend service news:

Montclair-Boonton Line:

Weekday service has been restored between Hackettstown and Hoboken/New York on a MODIFIED SCHEDULE.

Starting Monday, November 19, MidTOWN DIRECT service between Montclair State University and New York will operate on a regular schedule. Limited shuttle service between Hackettstown and Hoboken will operate on a special schedule.

Normal weekend service will operate between Bay Street and Hoboken – with connecting Midtown Direct service to/from New York – this weekend. View weekend schedule.

27 Comments

  1. POSTED BY gerryg  |  November 19, 2012 @ 9:56 am

    Utter failure. NJT systems can’t handle full service yet. Hoboken trains delayed again and Midtown Direct took almost an extra hour to get into Penn St. They should have kept the modified schedule until they properly fix the system. No need to rush the service, raise hopes and aggravate people in the process. We know it will take time, so make the fixes gradually and not stress an already difficult restoration.

  2. POSTED BY njgator  |  November 19, 2012 @ 10:15 am

    It’s going to be rough going for a good, long while.

    Exclusive: New Jersey railway put trains in Sandy flood zone despite warnings

    (Reuters) – New Jersey Transit’s struggle to recover from Superstorm Sandy is being compounded by a pre-storm decision to park much of its equipment in two rail yards that forecasters predicted would flood, a move that resulted in damage to one-third of its locomotives and a quarter of its passenger cars.

    That damage is likely to cost tens of millions of dollars and take many months to repair, a Reuters examination has found.

    The Garden State’s commuter railway parked critical equipment – including much of its newest and most expensive stock – at its low-lying main rail yard in Kearny just before the hurricane. It did so even though forecasters had released maps showing the wetland-surrounded area likely would be under water when Sandy’s expected record storm surge hit. Other equipment was parked at its Hoboken terminal and rail yard, where flooding also was predicted and which has flooded before.

    Among the damaged equipment: nine dual-powered locomotive engines and 84 multi-level rail cars purchased over the past six years at a cost of about $385 million.

    “If there’s a predicted 13-foot or 10-foot storm surge, you don’t leave your equipment in a low-lying area,” said David Schanoes, a railroad consultant and former deputy chief of field operations for Metro North Railroad, a sister railway serving New York State. “It’s just basic railroading. You don’t leave your equipment where it can be damaged.”

    After Reuters made numerous inquiries to state and local officials this week about the decision to store equipment in the yards, an unidentified senior transportation official told the New York Post that NJ Transit had launched an internal probe, the Post reported on Saturday.

    NJ Transit Chairman James S. Simpson, the state’s transportation commissioner, told Reuters on Saturday he knew of no such investigation. NJ Transit spokesman John Durso said the agency had not launched a probe but would examine its response to the storm, as “is standard procedure following any major incident.”

    The Post said it stood by its story.

    As of Friday, almost three weeks after the storm, the agency was still struggling to restore full service for its 136,000 daily rail commuters, running just 37 trains into New York Penn Station during the morning rush hour, rather than its usual 63. More service will be restored on Monday. The disruptions have caused long delays and crowded trains for Jersey residents who work in the biggest U.S. city.

    James Weinstein, NJ Transit’s executive director, said he did not expect the loss of equipment to have a significant effect on service in the coming weeks and months.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/11/18/us-storm-sandy-newjersey-railway-idUSBRE8AG0K220121118

  3. POSTED BY Mrs Martta  |  November 19, 2012 @ 10:24 am

    Ugh…what a mess…why would they do such a thing after they were warned? What kind of people are running our transportation infrastructure?

  4. POSTED BY bebopgun  |  November 19, 2012 @ 11:52 am

    Maybe the railcars didn’t work and NJT’s actions were on purpose to collect insurance on the nonworking cars. Word is the new ones were littered with problems.

  5. POSTED BY walleroo  |  November 19, 2012 @ 12:58 pm

    The Garden State’s commuter railway parked critical equipment – including much of its newest and most expensive stock – at its low-lying main rail yard in Kearny just before the hurricane. It did so even though forecasters had released maps showing the wetland-surrounded area likely would be under water when Sandy’s expected record storm surge hit. Other equipment was parked at its Hoboken terminal and rail yard, where flooding also was predicted and which has flooded before. Among the damaged equipment: nine dual-powered locomotive engines and 84 multi-level rail cars purchased over the past six years at a cost of about $385 million.

    This is just unbef*ckinglievable.

    How stupid can a person in charge of so many millions of dollars of equipment, whose job impact so many millions of people, be? Is it possible to be any stupider than a NJT employee or manager? I thought I had seen stupidity and incompetence before, but I now realize that I was naive. This is stupidity and moronicness on an entirely new plane. It’s the fourth dimension of idiocy. These people make the Three Stooges look like graduates of Harvard, Oxford and Cambridge. At least the creeps, thieves and vultures who ran our economy into the ground were doing so for their own personal gain–that I can at least understand, as deplorable as it is. But this? To executive stupidity on such a grand scale without purpose–that’s what makes the NY Transit cock-up of 2012 the 8th wonder of the world.

    I’m going out now to get some lunch. I need a drink.

  6. POSTED BY Mrs Martta  |  November 19, 2012 @ 1:20 pm

    These people make the Three Stooges look like graduates of Harvard, Oxford and Cambridge.

    And they make DeCamp brass look like Rhodes Scholars.

  7. POSTED BY Right of Center  |  November 19, 2012 @ 1:31 pm

    “James Weinstein, NJ Transit’s executive director, said he did not expect the loss of equipment to have a significant effect on service in the coming weeks and months.”

    Makes one wonder, doesn’t it, why then we needed the 10′s of millions of dollars of non-needed equipment in the first place? Step one should be the firing of Weinstein, then whichever lower managers were directly responsible.

  8. POSTED BY Right of Center  |  November 19, 2012 @ 1:32 pm

    p.s. Reminds me of the double speak on the the fire contract with Glen Ridge. Covering 30% more homes than Montclair “won’t cost us anything” but this doesn’t mean that absent that contract the Fire Department is overbuilt.

  9. POSTED BY croiagusanam  |  November 19, 2012 @ 1:44 pm

    That IS a remarkable statement from Weinstein. If the removal of all this equipment will have no impact on the level of service, then clearly the equipment is not needed.

    Management at this operation is really something to behold.

  10. POSTED BY walleroo  |  November 19, 2012 @ 2:29 pm

    Step one should be the firing of Weinstein, then whichever lower managers were directly responsible.

    It bears repeating.

  11. POSTED BY walleroo  |  November 19, 2012 @ 2:30 pm

    Weinstein’s remark upon discovering that nearly $400 million worth of new equipment was underwater:

    “D’oh!”

  12. POSTED BY jerseygurl  |  November 19, 2012 @ 2:33 pm

    ‘roo, how was lunch? I had a salad with seared tuna.

  13. POSTED BY Mrs Martta  |  November 19, 2012 @ 2:36 pm

    Maybe he has a secret desire to be a U-boat operator.

  14. POSTED BY walleroo  |  November 19, 2012 @ 2:36 pm

    Okay, ‘gurl, thanks, but I have heartburn.

  15. POSTED BY jerseygurl  |  November 19, 2012 @ 2:43 pm

    Well, it will be fun and games when the fares increase to cover the cost of their incompetence.
    I suspect we’ll be paying more for electricity, too. Ah, counting down the years to living in a warmer climate. No commute. A fan during the day and desert breezes at night. Margarita in hand.

  16. POSTED BY kay  |  November 19, 2012 @ 2:56 pm

    ‘Roo, I wholeheartedly agree with everything you said, but I fear greatly for your dear, furry little blood pressure. Hope you had some calming libations with your lunch!

    Gurl, soon I will be prowling the west coast until I find Conan’s house. Want to tag along?

  17. POSTED BY jerseygurl  |  November 19, 2012 @ 3:06 pm

    Kay, how hard can it be to find a Bostonian in Santa Barbara? Hope he has room for both of us.

  18. POSTED BY kay  |  November 19, 2012 @ 3:11 pm

    Gurl, even if he doesn’t have room *inside*, the weather is nice enough that I’d be happy to stay in a tent *outside* (with bathroom privileges, of course).

    sigh

  19. POSTED BY Mrs Martta  |  November 19, 2012 @ 3:19 pm

    The California desert is looking better to me every day.

  20. POSTED BY jerseygurl  |  November 19, 2012 @ 3:27 pm

    Mrs. M, me too. If I can’t afford Paso Robles or Carpenteria or San Luis Obispo, it’ll be Baja.
    But I’m ready for warm days, cool nights and a slower lifestyle. I just hope there isn’t another global economic collapse to thwart this plan B. Plan A is already not possible.

  21. POSTED BY kay  |  November 19, 2012 @ 3:32 pm

    One of my plans is to buy a dirty-water-dog cart and bring it to Catalina. And if I don’t sell any, who really cares?! Just sleep on the beach.

  22. POSTED BY Mrs Martta  |  November 19, 2012 @ 3:43 pm

    Palm Desert and surrounding area is nice, too.

  23. POSTED BY dan tanna  |  November 19, 2012 @ 11:24 pm

    You’re thinking California desert because of the storm?

    Palm Desert?

    cough, San Andreas fault cough …

    Paso Robles and SLO are no better.

  24. POSTED BY Mrs Martta  |  November 20, 2012 @ 9:58 am

    We stayed with my brother and SIL in Palm Desert last November and fell in love with the climate there. So this was way before Sandy. As many of you know, I don’t care for winter in NJ. Damp, cold, icy roads, no thanks. Palm Desert, on average gets about 10 inches of rain a year, no snow (except in the picturesque mountains). Besides the climate, the pace there is mellower. The frenetic pace of the NY-NJ metro area wears on you. It’s tolerable when you’re young but as you get into your middle years, it’s just one big headache.

    A physician friend pointed out that people in warmer climes (we’re not talking Third World here, just in general) tend to be healthier and live longer, probably because they get higher natural doses of vitamin D and spend more time being active outdoors than cooped up inside with forced hot air.

    Granted it does get very hot in the desert in July-August and that is when many of its residents take their vacations to cooler climes. But I think it would be nice to never have to wear a heavy coat or snow boots again.

  25. POSTED BY jerseygurl  |  November 20, 2012 @ 10:37 am

    I’m with Mrs. M. I have spent many years traveling to LA for business and have spent tons of time in various locations all along the coast for film shoots. And I’ve spent many many vacations in Mexico. I always feel better after I’ve been there for a week or two in terms of joint problems, asthma etc. On cool days my fingers get numb and my knee and hip pain are pretty bad, but all that goes away when I’m near the ocean and the desert. I’ll take my chances with the fault.

  26. POSTED BY kay  |  November 20, 2012 @ 10:55 am

    Earthquakes? Psssht! No biggie, just lay next to the sofa or in a doorway with a header for thirty seconds and pray, then it’s all over. Heck I even remember the earthquake drills from my grammar school days – they were similar to the air-raid drills – get under your desk! Plus a good portion of the infrastructure and building codes are designed to withstand a certain level of quaking (well, maybe not double decker freeways). But now that I know how to prepare (hoard) I could be ready. I’ll even bring a generator and all those Californians will be like, Hey look at that girl from Back East, what is that *thing* making all that noise, and How does she have lights??!

    BTW there is a fault here too, and our population density and ancient buildings would create massive havoc should ‘the big one’ ever hit.

  27. POSTED BY redrum  |  November 20, 2012 @ 1:15 pm

    NJT’s true colors of complete incompetence and mismanagement were surely evident with this hurricane. Why someone, who is making a 6-figure salary, would decide to leave $385,000,000 worth of equipment sitting in a sea-level marsh for predicted record-setting storm surges is incomprehensible. Sadly, we will be the ones paying the price with astronomical fare increases because of NJT’s mistakes.

Leave a Reply

Baristanet Comment Policy:

Baristanet has specific guidelines for commenting. To avoid having your comment deleted -- or your commenting privileges revoked -- read this before you comment. Violators will be banned from commenting.

Report a comment that violates the guidelines to comments@baristanet.com. For trouble with registration or commenting, write to comments@baristanet.com.

Commenters on Baristanet.com are responsible for all legal consequences arising from their comments, including libel, infringement of copyright or actions that threaten a third party. By submitting a comment, you agree to indemnify Baristanet LLC, its partners and employees from any legal action arising from your comments.

In order to comment on the new system, you need to register a new Baristanet account. To get your own avatar next to your comments, sign up at Gravatar.com

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Featured Comment

Will Ted Nugent be banned from staying at the hotel?

Tip, Follow, Friend, Subscribe

Links & Information

New Jersey Gas Prices provided by GasBuddy.com
Click here to add this map to your website.