MSU Explores Inner Worlds Of Blanche And Stanley In A Streetcar Named Desire

BY  |  Friday, Nov 15, 2013 2:26pm  |  COMMENTS (2)

Photo: Mike Peters, Montclair State University.

Photo: Mike Peters, Montclair State University.

Kari Margolis, theater artist that brought Insula to MSU last year, now brings a unique representation of Tennessee William’s A Streetcar Named Desire. Presented by Montclair State University’s Department of Theatre and Dance, Streetcar is at the Alexander Kasser Theater until November 17.

Southern belle and drama queen Blanche DuBois (Anna Voyce) visits her sister Stella (Brittany Sambogna) and her husband Stanley Kowalski (Matt Petrucelli) in their two-room 1940s New Orleans home. Tensions rise between the three as Blanche constantly butts heads with Stanley because of their opposite personalities and lifestyles, until her deep dark secrets are revealed.

Photo: Mike Peters, Montclair State University.

Photo: Mike Peters, Montclair State University.

Margolis’ direction implements the use of movement, backdrop animation screens on the set, microphones and music. Multi-talented cast members incorporate some music of their own, such as singing and playing instruments. Senior Matt Dubrow is often found onstage either playing the harmonica and guitar for some scenes or acting as Mitch, Blanche’s love interest. What is most unique to this production is that it includes students playing characters called “Inner Blanche” and “Inner Stanley.” These cast members share lines and actions with Voyce and Petrucelli and serve as the characters’ inner selves, but do so with mixed success. It adds a different artistic flair by giving the characters more depth, but it also causes distraction because you have to pay attention to more. It’s hard to focus on the interaction between two characters in the scene when really you are seeing nine people onstage. The result is these added players are experienced as other characters, such as members of Stanley’s crew, as opposed to extensions of the original characters instead.

Petrucelli has big shoes to fill playing the iconic Stanley Kowalski made popular by Marlon Brando, so he decided to make the brutish character more likable to audiences to help his portrayal stand out.

“I really tried to play with the humor and play on the likability,” says Petrucelli.

Photo: Mike Peters, Montclair State University.

Photo: Mike Peters, Montclair State University.

The main standout is senior Anna Voyce playing Blanche, for we see her the most on the stage and she captures Blanche’s deterioration well.

This is a different production of Streetcar altogether and those who watch it will experience the storytelling individuality this show offers.

For tickets and more information, you can call the Box Office at 973-655-5112 or go online.

2 Comments

  1. POSTED BY idratherbeat63  |  November 15, 2013 @ 3:03 pm

    This is a brilliant play and true Americana. It is also torturous in its realism. Montclair used to have a streetcar running through its heart in the late 1800′s and early 1900′s. Still the play speaks in many ways even more to the Montclair of today.

  2. POSTED BY traderdube  |  November 17, 2013 @ 11:01 am

    This presentation of Streetcar is a creative tour de force. The directors vision is so fresh and unique.
    The clarity the production brings to the deep rooted emotional tsunami that is Blanche and Stanley equals the brutal power of the film version. To think that this theater group put this dazzling portrayal together in 5 weeks, and that it meets and exceeds the portrayal that is so etched in our minds.
    Streetcar is a bold fresh approach to theater and the cast overachieves every scene.

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