Montclair and Ted Nugent: The Show — And Protest — Will Go On

BY  |  Tuesday, Jul 22, 2014 9:00am  |  COMMENTS (42)

ted nugentPlenty of commenters weighed in about whether the Wellmont should have booked Ted Nugent to perform.

Tonight, the show, and a planned protest will go on, according to John Atlas, who adds blogged on NJ.com, that Freeholder Pat Sebold, Freeholder Brendan Gill, who also chairs Montclair’s Democratic Party, and Montclair council member Bob Russo will be joining the protest.

“I wonder whether this is reflective of the owners views or economically driven,” said Gill. “Either way, a conscious business owner wouldn’t want to bring such a divisive figure in town. We also have to understand that under the First Amendment, people are entitled to their freedom of speech, but business owners can also make moral and ethical decisions to the community they serve.

Atlas is president of the National Housing Institute, publisher of Shelterforce, is the author of SEEDS OF CHANGE. The Story of Acorn, America’s Most Controversial Anti-Poverty Community Group(Vanderbilt University Press 2010).

42 Comments

  1. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 9:38 am

    Idaho tribe cancels Ted Nugent casino concert over rocker’s racist comments
    http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2014/jul/21/cda-casino-cancels-ted-nugent-show-cites-rockers-p/

  2. POSTED BY profwilliams  |  July 22, 2014 @ 9:51 am

    Way to go Gill!!!

    To hell with Free Speech, free enterprise. The shame of a Gov Official to question a business in such a ham handed way (“I wonder whether this is reflective of the owners views or economically driven”). When we KNOW there are plenty of other businesses that cause MUCH greater harm, and Mr. Gill remains silent.

    What about a wine shop/bar? More folks get killed from drunk drivers than Mr. Nugent. Will Gill be protesting? Nope. He won’t.

    What about CVS? They (still) sell cigarettes and candy (!!!). Will Mr. Gill be protesting?

    Or is it because of this fake outrage (internet comments!) and the possibility of a microphone and some publicity?

    Mr. Gill should take a page from Obama when questioned about Donald Sterling: “When people — when ignorant folks want to advertise their ignorance you don’t really have to do anything, you just let them talk.”

    Rather, Mr. Gill though is only going to embolden Mr. Nugent, which I suspect is what he wants.

    As for the Wellmont, I sure hope they don’t start “self-sensoring” because of the likes of these politicians.

    This not-so-subltle intimidation by Mr. Gill and Russo, smacks of opportunism.

  3. POSTED BY profwilliams  |  July 22, 2014 @ 10:07 am

    Oh, and is Mr. Gill really offering the idea that HIS morals and ethics should guide us? Or worse, is he suggesting that minority of views be squashed by the majority’s “moral” and “ethics”?

    I thought a diversity of ideas and views made for a robust democracy? It seems Mr. Gill feels differently.

  4. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 10:10 am

    “To hell with Free Speech, free enterprise” – not in the slightest. Both are in full effect here. Nugent is free to speak as he wishes, and free to then try to make a living as a performer. And the protesters are free to speak in protest of Nugent’s abhorrent comments, and use their power as consumers to send a message to a local business about the community’s moral and ethical standards. Sounds pretty all-American to me.

  5. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 10:17 am

    “is he suggesting that minority of views be squashed by the majority’s “moral” and “ethics”?” – there is no squashing. Nugent has all sorts of public places that he is free to speak. This is a private venue, which, like Nugent, is trying to make money. However, yes, it is society’s duty to speak out against racism and hatred, whether it comes from a majority or a minority.

  6. POSTED BY Bill Courson  |  July 22, 2014 @ 10:23 am

    In view of the fact that this particularly pathetic has-been is as obnoxious as he is, what is one to do?

    True, it may be the more effective response to Mr. Nugent’s presence to simply ignore him and his addle-pated rants, but I – like Messrs. Gill and Russo – am outraged. Does the good professor suggest I and others similarly outraged “sit down and shut up”, or is he suggesting that our outrage is insincere and affected?

    Nugent is a well-known spokesman for a wide array of right-wing, racist, anti-woman and homophobic causes, among which his most enthusiastic support is lent to the National Rifle Association in its promotion of “gun rights.”

    He has called musician Stevie Wonder a “brainless monkey” (an epithet he has also applied to the President Obama, along with calling the President a “subhuman mongrel”) for organizing a boycott of Nugent’s performances in the state of Florida owing to his support of that state’s “Stand Your Ground” law and in support of Trayvon Martin’s killer, George Zimmerman. He described the victim as a “dope smoking gangsta wannabe.”

    He has called Hillary Clinton a “worthless b****” and three years ago and, in an address to a Saint Louis NRA convention, affirmed that he would be “dead or jailed” if Barack Obama were re-elected (he is, of course, neither). He has earned a fortune purveying his views through such classic tunes as “jailbait” wherein he celebrates his pedophilia, boasting lyrically about having sex with countless underage females.

    This self-described patriot and advocate of “freedom from governmental intrusion” is known to have evaded the Vietnam-era draft by taking drugs before and behaving as though he were mentally unbalanced during his pre-induction physical examination – this by his own admission decades afterward.

    Really, Professor, as the self-named “Motor City Madman” is touring America spewing hateful, anti-Black, anti-gay, anti-child, anti-woman, pro-gun rants, how is it – why is it – that a community like Montclair shouldn’t mount a response?

    Myself, I’m going to make a donation to a charitable organization working on behalf of the victims of gun violence. I’d like to suggest that others so inclined do similarly. But I’d also suggest they get out and make their feelings about Mr. Nugent and his message known.

  7. POSTED BY theprimroseplath  |  July 22, 2014 @ 10:48 am

    I stand by my comments from the first thread concerning this protest. Ted Nugent is irrelevant. Nobody in the target “music audience” demographic knows who he is. I’ve always gotten a whiff of phoniness off of him. He’s a businessman, most likely playing this role to line his pockets. Do as you like, but I think protesting him (also free speech) is a waste of time that could be used in valuable ways. You know what they say, don’t feed the trolls.

  8. POSTED BY stu  |  July 22, 2014 @ 11:28 am

    Anyone who protests this show is simply enabling the village idiot. The larger the protest, the greater will be the negative publicity and the greater the likelihood is that he will play the Wellmont again. If you want to send the correct message to the Wellmont, boycott the Wellmont. Even if it’s Bill Maher who is performing next week.

  9. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 12:01 pm

    stu, I’m liberal and I also think Bill Maher is an idiot, though not the festering boil on the nation’s backside that Nugent has become. I don’t expect any apologies for Nugent’s behavior from anyone but Nugent, so I ask that you don’t expect an apology for Maher from anybody but Maher.

  10. POSTED BY silverleaf  |  July 22, 2014 @ 12:06 pm

    Ted Nugent is a washed-up, peripheral, rancorous has been. His relevancy and popularity tonight will be measured in box office receipts, or more correctly, lack thereof. Those who attend the show will reflect and celebrate his vitriolic sexist, racist, homophobic, and pedophile beliefs, attitudes. and behavior. Personally, you couldn’t pay me to watch this idiot on stage. And neither will I be there in protest. To do so will only enbolden him to continue to perform his pathetic music and encourage people to attend future shows. I can only imagine the losers entering and exiting the Wellmont tonight.

  11. POSTED BY stu  |  July 22, 2014 @ 12:08 pm

    “I don’t expect any apologies for Nugent’s behavior from anyone but Nugent,”

    Don’t hold your breath.

  12. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 12:11 pm

    And I agree with primrose and others who think a protest is giving the man more attention than he deserves. How about using his visit to organize something more constructive that will endure beyond this one event? Is there a wall or park bench that could be a canvas for quotes from famous Americans on the subject of human rights and civil liberties?

  13. POSTED BY cathar  |  July 22, 2014 @ 12:19 pm

    So poor old liberal fogey Courson was (reliably, to be sure) terming Ted Nugent a “particularly pathetic has been.” (Compared to whom, Courson? Jane Fonda? David Crosby? Stray members of the Kennedy family? Billy Ayers”? Even Marlo Thomas?)

    Well, I’n sure Ted Nugent can still conjure up a great guitar riff or two if requested. While thee, Courson, you have your…..uh…oh, okay…you have your yoga!

    Speaking of pathetic relics, however, has anyone besides me ever leafed through Atlas’s embarrassingly admiring “history” of ACORN?

  14. POSTED BY cathar  |  July 22, 2014 @ 12:23 pm

    I’m also guessing that “Freeholder Brendan Gill” is no relation to the New Yorker’s longtime architectural critic of that name, who often mourned in print how much Times Square “lost” by being cleaned up and made safer for the rest of us.

    Only the prof, the good prof (of course, I think, and by way of special comparison to the forever wearying Courson) has remained a beacon of good sense in his commentary on this crucial matter involving Marcusian “repressive tolerance,” by the way.

  15. POSTED BY John Lytle  |  July 22, 2014 @ 1:00 pm

    I have never agreed to any of Nugent’s political views, yet I would affirm his right to express them anywhere in the USA. I love the 1st amendment!

    More thought on political correctness, censorship, and self-censorship follow:

    ‘At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed that all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to say this, that or the other, but it is ‘not done’ to say it.’
    The quote above is an extract from George Orwell’s essay The Freedom of the Press, his proposed preface to Animal Farm. In it he describes the difficulty he faced in 1943 in getting the novel accepted due to the self-censorship being exercised by publishers, at that time, of anything that was critical of WW2 allies, the USSR under Stalin. It was initially rejected by four publishers, including T.S. Eliot at Faber, on the grounds of political insensitivity rather than literary merit. Orwell argues in his essay that this form of voluntary censorship that conceals views against the prevailing orthodoxy of opinion could be as dangerous to freedom of speech as direct political intervention.
    As Orwell also here contends, yesterday’s unorthodox expressions can become today’s accepted opinion. So this proved true for Animal Farm. By the time the novel was eventually published in 1945 criticism of the USSR was becoming more vocal, contributing to the novel’s instant success. Curiously, although there was space in the proofs for a preface in the first edition, none appeared and Orwell’s essay did not surface until 1972 when it was printed in The Times Literary Supplement.

  16. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 1:23 pm

    OMG please enough with the 1st Amendment and Free Speech arguments. No one is preventing Nugent from speaking his mind and expressing his views. He can say what he wants, where he wants in public. In this case, however, he is performing in a private venue for money. The owner of the venue is free to decide who performs there, and the public can decide if it wants to support a business that hire such a performer. But even if every Nugent show is cancelled, and no venue will book him, Nugent’s freedom of speach is in no way being impeded or infringed.

  17. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 1:25 pm

    oy, speel chek pleeze

  18. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 1:34 pm

    And John, do you honestly believe that Nugent’s “unorthodox expressions” could become tomorrow’s “accepted opinion”? I’d suggest that Nugent’s views actually represent the old accepted opinion from Orwell’s time. I doubt very much that Orwell had someone like Nugent in mind, and, more likely, Orwell would have found Nugent to be a symbol of the last vestiges of the failing orthodoxy.

  19. POSTED BY John Lytle  |  July 22, 2014 @ 1:48 pm

    I don’t believe Nugent’s “unorthodox expressions” could become tomorrow’s “accepted opinion.” However I also believe in the “slippery slope” expression regarding censorship and suppression of political expression. I certainly hope they don’t.

    The best protest: convince friends, family, and others not to buy tickets or attend.

    2nd best protest don’t buy tickets yourself or attend.

    Orwell had trouble getting his own book, Animal Farm, published due to self-censorship that was common during WW2 and immediately afterwards. So I think he had ALL writers and artists in mind, including despicable characters like Mr Nugent.

  20. POSTED BY silverleaf  |  July 22, 2014 @ 1:59 pm

    “Well, I’n sure Ted Nugent can still conjure up a great guitar riff or two if requested.”

    I’ll just bet he can’t sing like Jim Morrison, eh cathar?

    But it is both interesting and not unlike you that you’ve chosen to A) criticize Bill Courson, B) venerate “the good” prof, C) showcase your knowledge of (though irrelevant to this thread) “The New Yorker’s” Brendan Gill, and D) celebrate the so called musical virtue’s of a has been, over the hill rocker, rather than addressing the real theme of this thread.

    Not sure, but Bill Courson referring to Nugent as a “particularly pathetic has been” probably more favorably compares to David Duke, Mel Gibson, and Ann Coulter.

  21. POSTED BY profwilliams  |  July 22, 2014 @ 2:46 pm

    State Street Pete,

    You fail to recognize that since an elected politician has entered into this, the trigger of the Government quelling speech is upon us.

    So while you are correct that Nugent’s rights are not violated, having a politician offering a veiled threat that “a conscious business owner wouldn’t want to bring such a divisive figure in town,” is chilling speech by THE GOVERNMENT.

    So suddenly, this IS a First Amendment issue for Mr. Nugent, AND the owners of the Welmont theater.

    Will Mr. Gill exert some political muscle if, say, the Welmont seeks some Government approval in the future? (“Aren’t you the business that didn’t have the moral authority to NOT have Ted Nugent perform? Sorry. Denied.”)

    So spare us your misunderstanding of exactly how, now, this IS a First Amendment issue.

    Will other local businesses, schools, and colleges think twice about hiring a performer or speaker for fear that Mr. Gill, or some other Democrat (the party of the people!) might step up the microphone?

    This is exactly why we have this Amendment.

    But then again, I don’t think the 9/11 terrorists were heroic in their actions…..

  22. POSTED BY jcunningham  |  July 22, 2014 @ 3:08 pm

    “So spare us your misunderstanding of exactly how, now, this IS a First Amendment issue.”

    —only if you spare us from your asinine theorizing about how gill’s action might one day, maybe, perhaps lead to the repeal of the first amendment. it’s shrill, hysterical and entirely without basis in reality. typical.

  23. POSTED BY leeparker  |  July 22, 2014 @ 3:16 pm

    Thank you so much, Mr. Gill! I appreciate you making my mind up for me! Please don’t allow me to make my own decisions! Please don’t allow me to speak MY mind, if it differs from what’s on YOUR mind. What a joke.

  24. POSTED BY boonanas  |  July 22, 2014 @ 3:27 pm

    I didn’t see anyone protesting Lynyrd Skynyrd and they have a song called “God & Guns”. Montclair moms are vengeance-filled blood thirsty beasts.

  25. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 3:46 pm

    oh prof, you tie yourself in knots. I hope every racist, sexist, bigot feels a chill.

  26. POSTED BY mike 91  |  July 22, 2014 @ 3:47 pm

    You fail to recognize that since an elected politician has entered into this, the trigger of the Government quelling speech is upon us.

    Oh stop it. He mentions Nugent’s First amendment rights in the next sentence.

    So while you are correct that Nugent’s rights are not violated, having a politician offering a veiled threat that “a conscious business owner wouldn’t want to bring such a divisive figure in town,” is chilling speech by THE GOVERNMENT.

    Uh, so were his rights violated or not? You are contradicting yourself.

    Will Mr. Gill exert some political muscle if, say, the Welmont seeks some Government approval in the future? (“Aren’t you the business that didn’t have the moral authority to NOT have Ted Nugent perform? Sorry. Denied.”)

    Or maybe, Martians will come and cancel all the Ted Nugent shows! How about when Gill does something, we worry about it then. Because so far, all Gill has done is express an opinion, which as I’m sure you know, elected officials are allowed to have. I might add that its an opinion the vast majority of this constituents hold.

    And everyone in the “ignore him and he’ll go away” camp forgets that he won’t go away because there will always be some segment of the population receptive to his racist, misogynistic, disrespectful comments because some segment of people are always going to suck. How many times has he been on national television? So protest away, if nothing else to put that segment on notice.

  27. POSTED BY State Street Pete  |  July 22, 2014 @ 3:55 pm

    boonanas, you could likely find offensive stuff that came from the mouths of many who have performed at the Wellmont, but none that reach the heights of the Nuge. But I must say that “Montclair moms are vengeance-filled blood thirsty beasts” conjures quite a mental picture. I see a minivan done up a la Mad Max, with a crazed mom in blood soaked yoga pants, with a Starbucks in one hand and a huge knife between her teeth.

  28. POSTED BY silverleaf  |  July 22, 2014 @ 3:56 pm

    “oh prof, you tie yourself in knots.”

    The knotty professor!

  29. POSTED BY Spiro T. Quayle  |  July 22, 2014 @ 4:01 pm

    another good one, silver leaf

  30. POSTED BY profwilliams  |  July 22, 2014 @ 4:04 pm

    jcunningham & mike 91,

    You both seem to not understand the idea of “chilling” speech. Your endless (and pointless) argument of “what ifs” IS the point.

    You understand that much of our Constitution and its Amendments offer answers to “what ifs”?

    But here, you- mike 91, in a time of IRS targeting, NSA surveillance, offer such a quaint (if not silly) understanding of how Gill’s comments and threats harms speech, I’m almost waiting to expecting to see “Mayberry, RFD” tonight.

    Lastly, your final “call to the people” was incomprehensible. Or was that your version of “Wango, zee Tango”?

  31. POSTED BY townie  |  July 22, 2014 @ 4:08 pm

    For those protesting and those attending the show, please take the opportunity to also patronize a local restaurant or shop. All are economically driven and need your dollars!

  32. POSTED BY Spiro T. Quayle  |  July 22, 2014 @ 4:12 pm

    Amen, townie.

  33. POSTED BY silverleaf  |  July 22, 2014 @ 4:20 pm

    If nothing else, STQ, I am inspired by the prof. My muse, if you will!

  34. POSTED BY mike 91  |  July 22, 2014 @ 4:23 pm

    You both seem to not understand the idea of “chilling” speech.

    Oh I understand it. I just think you’re a loon for proposing that a freeholder’s opinion has any effect on anything. Is he, or is he not, allowed to have an opinion? Kinda dodged that one. And again, if the Wellmont feels like they have been some kind of victim, let them bring him to court. Otherwise, it’s just your fever dreams. The NSA. Hilarious.

    Lastly, your final “call to the people” was incomprehensible.

    I think I have in the past offered to post my comments in crayon if that makes it easier for you to understand them. I certainly can’t post in plainer English otherwise.

  35. POSTED BY ronm  |  July 22, 2014 @ 5:04 pm

    On “Freedom of Speech” rights.

    “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances”

    Translation: The GOVERNMENT and GOVERNMENT only cannot quiet your speech. Example: You cannot get ARRESTED under statute/law for what you express. And that’s the full extent of our “freedom of speech” rights. Getting arrested or censored by the state.

    Anything else goes.

    Citizens wanting to shut down Nugent have every legal right to do so. Want to fire someone on T.V. for their opinions…fine. NEITHER examples are violations of “freedom of speech”.

    The Police arrest Nugent outside the Welmont soley for his opinions…violation of his 1st amendment rights. Never seen that happen though.

    The ignorance of the 1st Amendment by 99% of Americans never ceases to amaze me.

  36. POSTED BY johnqp  |  July 23, 2014 @ 12:16 am

    So …. did Huckabee show up tonight on bass or not ?

  37. POSTED BY Spiro T. Quayle  |  July 23, 2014 @ 8:13 am

    I would have considered going to the concert had I known that Nugent was planning on performing some 1970′s John Lennon covers, featuring special guest Sarah Palin doing the Yoko Ono screeching and wailing. To paraphrase Buck Owens, All she’d have to do is act naturally. Rick Perry could do the count-ins ( “one, two, oops”). Clint Eastwood could talk to a chair. Now that’s a concert.

  38. POSTED BY mrx5000  |  July 23, 2014 @ 10:49 am

    “Cat Scratch Fever” rawks

  39. POSTED BY johnqp  |  July 23, 2014 @ 10:54 am

    Spiro , it’s not complete without Dick Cheney on the spoons.

  40. POSTED BY johnqp  |  July 23, 2014 @ 10:56 am

    And W himself on the washboard

  41. POSTED BY silverleaf  |  July 23, 2014 @ 11:05 am

    Yes, at least you can’t shoot your hunting partner with a spoon!

  42. POSTED BY samwich  |  July 23, 2014 @ 11:26 am

    I think it is terribly unfortunate that I’m about about to use the word “art” in the same sentence as “Ted Nugent,” but here goes. Art reflects life, and Ted Nugent has a platform for his nutso ranting because he is saying what a lot of people are thinking. He is the id of a slice of the population that is deeply angry at who is in charge at the national level and believe their political opponents are truly wrecking the country, however disconnected from reality that may be. He gets attention because most people who are aware of him either hate or love him. There aren’t a lot of people who are indifferent. When was the last time you heard about Teddy before 2008? I can’t remember either.

Leave a Reply

Baristanet Comment Policy:

Baristanet has specific guidelines for commenting. To avoid having your comment deleted -- or your commenting privileges revoked -- read this before you comment. Violators will be banned from commenting.

Report a comment that violates the guidelines to comments@baristanet.com. For trouble with registration or commenting, write to comments@baristanet.com.

Commenters on Baristanet.com are responsible for all legal consequences arising from their comments, including libel, infringement of copyright or actions that threaten a third party. By submitting a comment, you agree to indemnify Baristanet LLC, its partners and employees from any legal action arising from your comments.

In order to comment on the new system, you need to register a new Baristanet account. To get your own avatar next to your comments, sign up at Gravatar.com

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Featured Comment

Holsten's is a favorite of my 3-year-old daughter. She asks for it whenever we say "Where do you want to go for dinner?" And she prefers their homemade candy to their ice cream. I think she especially loves the family memories we've made there since she was a baby... and the stuffed animals don't hurt. Congratulations to our friends at Holsten's on 75 years!

Tip, Follow, Friend, Subscribe

Links & Information

New Jersey Gas Prices provided by GasBuddy.com
Click here to add this map to your website.