Memorial Day Remembered

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Above, flags of remembrance at Bloomfield Cemetery. Blogs around New Jersey honor Memorial Day here. If you attend any of the services or parades today, upload pictures of them here.

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3 COMMENTS

  1. Are the Baristas going to cover the race for Freeholder? In this area it’s the double dipping Caputo vs Russo, the former Mayor of Montclair.
    The Primary is on June 3rd and there’s been nothing here!
    Caputo promised not to run again for Freeholder if he won the assembly office. We took him at his word and he won. Now, he’s proven himself a liar and is running for Freeholder again.
    We get to pay for 2 pensions!

  2. THE BLOOMFIELD CEMETERY – (the first local public cemetery) (from Fred Branch?s Bloomfield Cemetery Walking Tour booklet 2001) (note that the curved paths were plotted by Calvert Vaux who later designed Central Park in NY with Fredrick Olmstead)
    Among the prominent Bloomfield/Glen Ridge citizens’ gravesites –
    THE SOLDIER’S BURRIAL PLOT -The grand army of the Republic (GAR) purchased this plot in 1888. Soldiers who fought in the Civil War are buried here along with patriots of later American conflicts. It is now overseen by the Bloomfield Joint Memorial Committee. 32 Revolutionary War soldiers are also buried in Bloomfield Cemetery in various locations throughout the grounds.
    Israel Crane (1774-1858) (created the Newark & Pompton Turnpike toll road that later became Bloomfield Avenue.)
    Alexander Jackson Davis (1803-1892) A. J. Davis was a founder of the original American Institute of Architects….Some of his notable buildings include the Sub Treasury Building on Wall Street… the State Capitols of North Carolina and Indiana… and Lyndhurst on Hudson. Locally, Davis designed five houses and the gatehouse in Llewellyn Park, a Gothic Revival Mansion in Montclair and an Italianate villa for Llewellyn Haskell in Montclair)
    CEMETERY HISTORY
    In 1796 Isaac Ball gave five acres of land to the First Presbyterian church for use as a burying ground. Deceased members of the church who had been buried in the surrounding grounds were re-interred in the new cemetery. The earliest identifiable tombstone is dated 1799.
    The cemetery was established on Belleville Avenue on open wheat fields owned by the Ball family that extended north to Chestnut Hill. An early map shows Belleville Avenue ending at the entrance gate of the cemetery.
    In the earliest years when a funeral procession arrived at the cemetery gate, the church bells would ring out the number of years attained by the deceased.
    In 1853 the Bloomfield Cemetery Company was incorporated when the Ball family sold it an additional twenty acres. A later purchase of five more acres put the total area of the cemetery at approximately thirty acres.
    The land east of the office once belonged to the Shelby family. There was a feed store and a school for girls on the property.
    Clay brick pits that were located in the northeast quadrants of the expanded acreage were abandoned. The Ball brick business produced a high quality of brick that was used in many local buildings including Seibert Hall, currently a part of the Bloomfield College Campus. An adjacent pond that had been popular for ice skating was drained in 1880. Sledding and picnicking continued to be enjoyed.
    Alexander Jackson Davis designed the original office in 1875 as his last commission. When the new office was designed in 1909, his gothic style building was moved to the rear of the property and later demolished.
    The wall along Belleview Avenue was completed in 1890. The sandstone may have come from the Glen Ridge Quarry & Mining Company. It is interesting to note that the steep grade of Belleville Avenue has been greatly reduced…
    …The names of many streets in Bloomfield honor families buried in the Bloomfield Cemetery. Farrand, Beach, Warren, Conger, Dodd, Williamson, Pitt, Osborne, Baldwin, Ward and Garrabrandt are avenues and streets that remind us of those who have gone before…”

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