Remembering Our Country’s Heroes

Memorial%20Day.jpgLet us not forget what this holiday is all about – the Americans who have died in military service to their country. This weekend’s Memorial Day Events in and around Baristaville honor those who gave their life. From NJ.com:

Bloomfield
Memorial Day services will begin at 8:30 a.m. Monday, with an annual service conducted by the Bloomfield Exempt Firemen’s Association along with the Bloomfield FMBA Local 19 on the lawn of the Firehouse. A parade commences at 9:30 a.m. with assembly taking place at 9 a.m. at Brookside Park. The public is encouraged to review the parade from the reviewing stand on The Green, across from Civic Center around 10:15 a.m. Following the program, there will be a picnic at the Newark-Bloomfield Elks’ Lodge at 26 Bloomfield Ave.
Glen Ridge
The annual Memorial Day parade will begin at Sherman Avenue and Baldwin Street and head south on Ridgewood Avenue. The parade will end at Ridgewood Avenue School, where a Memorial Day service will be held. Following the service, the community is invited to the town picnic in the Glen at Hurrell Field for food, amusements and live music. Activities take place between 10:45 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Monday.
Montclair
A Memorial Day Service will begin at 10 a.m. Monday at Edgemont Park on Valley Road. The Rev. John Perris, rector of St. James Episcopal Church, will deliver the invocation, bless the wreaths and give the benediction. Montclair High School’s the Passing Notes will perform the national anthem and the Montclair Community Band will perform patriotic music throughout the ceremony. The police honor guard and fire department will participate along with numerous veterans organizations. In case of rain, the service will be held at the Municipal Council Chambers at 205 Claremont Ave., at 10 a.m.
Listings of more services in Essex County and around the state are found here.
–photo, Kevin Godlington

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18 COMMENTS

  1. And they who for their country died shall fill an honored grave, for glory lights the soldier’s tomb, and beauty weeps the brave.
    ~Joseph Drake

  2. Anne
    Wonderful quote
    Its too bad that we are still filling those honored graves with more young bodies.
    It’s bad enough that we are filling them with old bodies that are to this day suffering from the effects of a war that took place a long time ago.

  3. There is some unfortunate over-crankiness above. And what sounds like a sullen referencing of either WWII, Korea and Vietnam. Would the poster rather we had no such “oldsters” hanging on amidst us? (I suggest the real fault here was the poster’s inability to format a declarative sentence.)
    In any event, it is decidedly not graves that we are meant to honor for Memorial Day, but the deeds and memories of those who served and have afterwards passed on. We might best save the debate for whether the cause that led to the deeds was honorable for another day. Perhaps a colder, grayer, even shorter one in terms of daylight, since today it really does seem that the heavens rejoice at the “sleep” of those who served and share in our commemoration of them.

  4. In any event, it is decidedly not graves that we are meant to honor for Memorial Day, but the deeds and memories of those who served and have afterwards passed on. We might best save the debate for whether the cause that led to the deeds was honorable for another day.
    _____________________________-
    I never thought I would be somewhat agreeing with Cathar up to a point. Where we are going to disagree sharply is our nation’s military history Post Korea.
    What was the purpose of Vietnam or the latest scavenger hunt for nonexistent
    WMD in Iraq? What are we doing in the name of democracy? What wars have to be fought first in the US?
    Well, honor those who died and enjoy your extended weekend.

  5. I think one of the best ways to honor the sacrifices of the fallen is take care of the veterans who struggle everyday with the physical, emotional, mental, and (given the proportion of citizen-soldiers in this conflict) financial sacrifices they have made in our name.
    Regardless how any of us feel about the Iraq war, and the policies, people, and decisions that led us here, the fact is that almost 30,000 US service members have been physically wounded in this conflict, and who knows how many more bear the emotional and psychological wounds of combat.
    Please donate your time or money to a veterans’ charity of your choice. Mine is the Disabled Veterans of America.

  6. I prefer to think of Memorial Day as the time to remember and thank those who have given the ultimate sacrifice for our country. I will do so while trying to forget the liberal tripe posted above by Ric and Surprise. While they may take offense at my statement they just don’t understand that most Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines are/would be offended by theirs (myself included). It’s not a day about politics, just the opposite. I Thank God for those who have made the ultimate sacrifice and though I strive for peace, pray this country will never find a time when nothing is worthing dying for.

  7. One “point” of US involvement in Vietnam, surprise, was to honor a serious commitment to an ally. An ally beset by a land-stealing, tyrannous neighbor that at any one time had some 5-8% of its own population illegally on the other side of the border, heavily armed and making mischief.
    (This ally, too, towards the end gave good account of itself in combat. The ARVN of 1967, say, was in no way comparable to the ARVN of ’72.)
    I’d hope you can thus open your heart enough, surprise, to at least support the plight of veterans (as Pork Roll sagely urges). To at least buy a “buddy poppy” this weekend even if you’re not soon planning a visit to Walter Reed to spread cheer. And to similarly scorn those wonderful Islamist and jihadist fanatics who so gleefully slaughter both their own co-religionists and US troops.
    Y’all have a nice, thoughtful weekend, too.

  8. cheese with your wine
    Please do not mistake my statements for liberal tripe, I am far from liberal.
    As for most Soldiers, Sailors, Airman and Marines or Coast Guardsman (yes there are five branches of the military service) being offended by what I wrote, I really don’t think those members of my veterans group would disagree with me.
    I am this Memorial Day remembering two friends who just recently passed away from the effects of exposure to Agent Orange during their time in Vietnam. That is the reason for my reference to old bodies. That was perhaps a poor chose of words since I don’t consider 62 as being old. Both men were too young to die but both served their country with honor and both had to fight with the VA to get what ever help they got.
    What ever else any one things about what I have said, let it be know that
    I AM A PROUD VIETNAM VET!!!!

  9. Who also has a little trouble typing because that should have read
    Whatever any one thinks about what I have said, let it be know that

  10. More “liberal tripe” for cheese-with-your-wine:
    “Bush and his cronies have undermined all the honor we fought for in World War II”
    Source:
    My Dad, Armed Forces Veteran, B-29 gunner, Pacific Theatre, World War II.

  11. “The libral’s are giving away our country, the one I fought for during my tender youth. I never thought I would live to see the day when the United States was hated by their own citizens”
    My Dad,84 years old US Army WWII Pacific Theater

  12. Geez Louise, why does every thread have to turn into a political diatribe? Can’t you put your political differences aside and just remember our veterans? Good war, bad war, legal war, illegal war, it ALL sucks…people still die. Any time an American serviceman or woman is killed, it’s tragic and solemn.

  13. Thank you, Miss Martta.
    My thoughts exactly.
    As always, the little prof and I will bike to the Montclair Service to pay our respects.
    Your words will be an simple and clear explanation:
    “Good war, bad war, legal war, illegal war, it ALL sucks…people still die. Any time an American serviceman or woman is killed, it’s tragic and solemn.”

  14. If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood come gurgling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
    Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
    Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues–
    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
    To children ardent for some
    desperate glory,
    The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
    Pro patria mori.
    Wilfred Owen

  15. Ric,
    Thanks for your clarification and thanks for your service. Apologies if I misinterpreted your writings. Hope your Memorial Day was great! Since Perstein’s Dad got cancelled out by Montcalirgil’s Dad, I’ll refrain from my equally inflammatory response.

Comments are closed.