The State of Volunteerism in NJ

Bloomfield volunteers.jpgA new report shows that more Americans are getting involved in their communities in multiple ways. In 2008 volunteering held steady while working with neighbors to solve community problems significantly increased over 2007.
As part of its mission to improve lives, strengthen communities,and foster civic engagement through volunteering and service, the Corporation for National and Community Service conducts research on the volunteering habits of Americans. The VolunteeringInAmerica.gov site houses the most comprehensive collection of information on volunteering and national service in the U.S. We looked at their key findings for New Jersey — how do we rank compared to other states? Fogedabodet! (The only consolation os that New York ranks worst of all.)
For those interested in hooking up with a volunteer organization, the state has a nifty new website.

from EcoRealty

Click here to sign up for Baristanet's free daily emails and news alerts.

19 COMMENTS

  1. “In 2008 volunteering held steady while working with neighbors to solve community problems significantly increased over 2007.”
    What does that mean?

  2. So my non-voluntary contribution to Montclair to the sum of $16,000+ a year doesn’t count?
    I’m expected to clean up the stream at the high school too?
    I did give out bottles of cold water to the road crew on Grove the other day, does that count for anything?
    I also stop and pick up errant garbage cans, branches and other debris on local roadways, does that get me into the Kingdom of Liberalism?
    But really, the best I can do for all is TURN MY PHONE OFF when I drive.
    If only we could get folks to do likewise, we might save a life, I’d rather have a few coke cans in the park versus the loss of life….

  3. Also if you look at those charts 2007 and 2008 are the lowest two years represented. So I’m not sure where you get “more” from in your lede. Last year?

  4. prof, funny how you opine on my IQ when you make a nonsensical argument that paying taxes on your “palatial Upper Montclair estate” and following a rule of safety re: cell phone usage and driving substitutes for volunteering.
    Or maybe you are looking for some recognition that you are a good Samaritan because you remove somebody’s garbage can from the road. St. Peter would surely let you through the pearly gates for that act alone.

  5. I like how baristanet only links to government run “volunteering”.
    What about non-profit charities not run by the state?

  6. I’m very active with Jersey Cares, a non-profit, community-based organization, providing individuals, families, corporate and community groups with a wide variety of volunteer opportunities. Jersey Cares partners with hundreds of non-profit agencies to provide service projects that range from building homes with Habitat for Humanity to comforting fragile infants at Hudson Cradle. Check out their website: http://www.jerseycares.org

  7. I was part of the event pictured above. It was the Ecco-Diversity-Frog-Stomp-2008. We traipsed around NJ streams stomping on non-native frogs which were crowding out native mosquito species. You stomped them or twisted their little heads off – thus the gloves. The guy in the yellow shirt had the record – 280!

  8. (prof realizes he needs to write to a lower common denominator– those who just now have heard of Prof. Gates. Folks like tudlow…)
    My “argument” was more of a joke about volunteerism. I also could have talked about the need for affluent kids- like those here in Baristaville- who “volunteer” as a way of padding their college applications.
    For me, I feel no great need to “volunteer” since I pay a TON of taxes– and considering how much of American life is shouldered by those in the top 5%, I don’t feel any great pull to clean up a stream.
    Though on my estate, I have been known to tip the gardener, does that count?
    Or must I actually, you know, touch the dirt?

  9. I don’t get the connection between paying taxes and volunteering either. Taxes aren’t voluntary. They pay for necessary services like garbage pick up and schools. Given that each kid costs the town just about 16k I’d say the prof’s tax dollars are a wash anyway since little prof is sucking 16k worth of taxes out of the town.

  10. If all we needed to do was pay taxes, we wouldn’t have garbage strewn about, no need for soup kitchens, Big Brothers Big Sisters, etc.
    It’s obvious that our taxes are not being used in a way we see fit so that is where volunteers step in, to pick up the slack left by our government, the same government that wants to provide us with health care but can’t even manage “cash for clunkers” properly.

  11. “It’s obvious that our taxes are not being used in a way we see fit so that is where volunteers step in, to pick up the slack left by our government,”
    So rather than paying for schools, garbage, fire and police you would rather see government run soup kitchens, and mentoring programs like Big Brother? Social programs? And this coming from a conservative?

  12. I always question the mental health of a person who repeatedly refers to himself in the third person.
    Of course I get your “argument” you silly, little, whiny, self-absorbed man! It just doesn’t make any sense to mock volunteering. Branding it with liberalism? Have you taken some time to look at the data? The more conservative, religious states are at the top. And how logical: “affluent” kids are complete asses for volunteering–it’s just a means to an end so they can get into college, they should spend more time at the country clubs instead of donating their time and effort to make a difference! But, you’re right, maybe the rest of America should take a moment to thank you for shouldering all of their needs and exempt you from ever “volunteering” because you pay taxes like everybody else.
    Gosh, I’m tiring of this back and forth. This could go on forever. I liked reading how croiagusanam put you in your place and he did a much better job than “tudlow” does. It’s just so darn hard not to offer a counterpoint with you without being insulting!

  13. JG: If they were doing their job, we wouldn’t need volunteers to clean up trails, parks and other public places. So much for govt. taking out the trash.
    We wouldn’t need so many social programs if government was doing its job in the first place. I did not mean that government should take over volunteer organizations and groups. That is your own interpretattion.
    Thank God for volunteers or nothing would ever get done!
    Do I sound bitter today? You betcha!

  14. Mrs. M – I’m curious to know your take on the government’s job and why there would be no need for volunteers. What is the job? To eliminate poverty? Single parenthood? Drug Abuse? All of society’s ills?
    I think the garbage in parks and on trails is not the fault of the government but people who litter.

  15. We wouldn’t need so many social programs if government was doing its job in the first place.
    And that job would be, uh, what exactly? Narrowing the gap between rich and poor? Hiring all unemployed people for make work jobs?

  16. God’s speed in figuring out MM’s libertarianism. From what I can glean her’s is a socialist-libertarian-keep-it-all-tidy-ism.

  17. ROC took his/her funny pills today! Between that last post and the one about “Frog-Stomp 2008” I was outright giggling.

  18. For me, I feel no great need to “volunteer” since I pay a TON of taxes– and considering how much of American life is shouldered by those in the top 5%, I don’t feel any great pull to clean up a stream.
    Are there no prisons?’ asked Scrooge.
    ‘Plenty of prisons,’ said the gentleman, laying down the pen again.
    ‘And the Union workhouses?’ demanded Scrooge. ‘Are they still in operation?’
    ‘They are. Still,’ returned the gentleman, ‘I wish I could say they were not.’
    ‘The Treadmill and the Poor Law are in full vigour, then?’ said Scrooge.
    ‘Both very busy, sir.’
    ‘Oh! I was afraid, from what you said at first, that something had occurred to stop them in their useful course,’ said Scrooge. ‘I’m very glad to hear it.’
    What shall I put you down for?’
    ‘Nothing!’ Scrooge replied.
    ‘You wish to be anonymous?’
    ‘I wish to be left alone,’ said Scrooge. ‘Since you ask me what I wish, gentlemen, that is my answer. I don’t make merry myself at Christmas and I can’t afford to make idle people merry. I help to support the establishments I have mentioned — they cost enough; and those who are badly off must go there.’

Comments are closed.