Worth The Trip: Millie’s Old World

1BThe Montclair Food & Wine Festival featured food purveyors from outside of Montclair. One of them was Millie’s Old World of Morristown. I discovered their table after more than a few people recommended their delicious meatballs. Last week, we made the trip over and tasted a whole lot more.

Millie’s Old World has a bold, modern decor, but the menu has old school favorites, some reimagined, as well as big portions you would find at a family-style Italian. It also has two ovens — coal and wood — allowing for fans of both to dine united. The latter can produce pies in 90 seconds thanks to 800+ degree heat. Certain pizza toppings are more suited to either coal or wood, and Millie’s menu reflects that.

What we liked (pictured): The meatballs — available in either marinara or a vodka sauce — were both excellent. Our favorite pizza from the coal oven — the best White Clam pie we’ve ever had. From the wood oven — the Arugula Pie — featuring goat cheese and fig spread on the crust, homemade mozzarella, and topped with prosciutto, arugula and shaved parmigianno reggiano. Also worth mentioning — the Arcadian Salad, with mized greens, candied walnuts, crumbled gorgonzola, apricot vinaigrette, red onion and slabs of applewood smoked bacon.

Millie’s is casual, BYOB and has a small outdoor dining area out front.

Millie’s Old World, 60 South St Morristown, 973-267-9616, lunch and dinner, seven days a week.

Got a place that’s worth the trip? Drop us a line at food at baristanet dot com.

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21 COMMENTS

  1. The food at and the people from Millie’s are great, and it’s right near the Mayo Center for the Performing Arts!

  2. OK, I don’t get it. I can drive 287 or I can go to Mancinni’s, Ruthie’s, Enzo’s, etc, etc.
    I’m happy for them, but driving 287? You either live in Morris County or you don’t.

  3. Puglia of New York in Red Bank (the supposed “hippest town in NJ” according to NJ Monthly and thus the presumed envy of Montclair) on Thursday nights offers cabozzele on its menu.

    NOTHING, I would suggest, says Italian “Old World-style” delights like cabozzele. And if you have to look the dish up to learn what it is, you’ve never truly been “old school” yourself in terms of Italian cuisine

  4. Try the food then tell me it’s not worth the drive. I’ve eaten there many times and I keep going back.

  5. Sometimes, you just want to get out of Montclair. Imagine that.
    Liz, those photos are mouthwatering and I’ll be happy to try Millie’s

  6. NOTHING, I would suggest, says Italian “Old World-style” delights like cabozzele. And if you have to look the dish up to learn what it is, you’ve never truly been “old school” yourself in terms of Italian cuisine

    You’d think someone sufficiently old school would know how to spell “capozelle.”

  7. Mike 91, you pitiful nitwit, it is always pronounced “ga…) with a “g” sound by those who have actual familiarity with the dish and its nurturing culture.

    Ah well, what else can I expect from someone whose idea ;f “authentic” Italian food is probably microwaved Celentano’s?

  8. Why on God’s good Earth would someone who lives in Montclair wanting to get out of town for a change drive to Morristown rather than, say, New York City? The only way I’d eat in Morristown is if I woke up there after a bender.

  9. As a rule, I refuse t drive more than 20 minutes for a BYOB restaurant. I can’t think of an exception to the rule.

  10. Mr. Roo & Frank+1

    The thought of driving southwest, rather than due east is odd. Perhaps for some “authentic” ethnic enclave’s tastes (like Iselin), but Italian?

    You can throw a rock in Baristaville and certainly NYC and find “a small family place, good food” where, “everyone minds his business.”

  11. Hate to break it to you guys but no matter how much you talk it up the food in Montclair is not very good…pretty much in keeping with the service and ambiance. Some places do try hard but let’s be real…

  12. Mike 91, you pitiful nitwit, it is always pronounced “ga…) with a “g” sound by those who have actual familiarity with the dish and its nurturing culture.

    Did I comment on how its pronounced? Would it surprise you that there are possibly other words we use that are spelled differently than their pronunciation? You scold others for not being authentic enough, but can’t even be bothered to make the minimum effort. Nitwit, indeed.

  13. mike91, your spelling of the word “capozelle” is absolutley correct! It derives from the word “capo”, meaning “head” . . . in this case, the cooked head of the sheep or lamb.

    The pheonetic use of the letter “g” is purely a matter of Southern Italian dialect here, typically Neapolitan, Sicilian, or Calabrese.

  14. flipside is right, the food experience in Montclair is generally not particularly good, compared to, say, NYC, or California, or New Orleans, or anwhere in Europe.

    But Morristown…? Gaghchgh!

  15. “In neither taste nor precision is any man’s practice a court of last appeal, for writers all, both great and small, are habitual sinners against the light; and their accuser is cheerfully aware that his own work will supply . . . many ‘awful examples.'”
    (Ambrose Bierce, Write It Right, 1909) …

    Did you mean: capozella?

  16. No, I meant “capozelle”, silly. The way it is spelled in “La Cucina della Mezzogiorno” an old cookbook that my grandmother brought with her to Ellis Island from Naples nearly 100 years ago. Its pages yellowed and spine fragile, but something that my family still holds sacred to today.

    You might consider contacting the editor, but wouldn’t count on getting an answer.

Comments are closed.